Robert D. Bradley's Laboratory

 

 

James Q. Francis
Teaching Assistant

M.S. student, Zoology, Texas Tech University
B.S. Biology, Texas Tech University

jq.francis@ttu.edu

As an undergraduate I worked for two years doing research in the Bradley lab, including work on molecular systematics of Geomys.  I then joined the Bradley lab (co-advised by Dr. Caleb Phillips) in August of 2015 as a Master's student.  My principle area of interest focuses on understanding the genetic structure of populations across North America of the North American Deer Mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) while trying to determine which genes are being selected on that leads to genetic variation, as well as trying to understand the phylogeography of the species. I am also still interested in systematics and am working on projects involving systematics of the genus Peromyscus and of Caribbean bats in the genus Monophyllus.

 

Laramie L. Lindsey
Teaching Assistant

 

Ph.D. student, Biology, Texas Tech University
M.S. Biology, Angelo State University
B.S. Biology, Southern Methodist University

laramie.lindsey@ttu.edu

I received my Master’s degree at Angelo State University working on the systematics of velvety free tailed bats from the genus Molossus. In the fall of 2014, I started working with Dr. Bradley. My research interests include systematics of Molossus bats, systematics of wood rats from the genus Neotoma, and transcriptomics and exomics of deer mice from the genus Peromyscus. My goal is to obtain a PhD focusing on bioinformatics and genomics, particularly comparing transcriptomes and exomes of sister taxa of Peromyscus in order to identify genes with putative testes-specific functions that may have played a role in speciation and the adaptive radiation of Peromyscus.

 

Emma K. Roberts
Teaching Assistant

Ph.D. student, Biology, Texas Tech University
B.S. Biology, Texas Tech University

emma.k.roberts@ttu.edu

My dissertation focuses on the molecular evolution of a reproductive protein called zonadhesin and the role of egg-sperm fusion proteins in isolation mechanisms in mammals. I am examining pairs of species that are known to hybridize, including pocket gophers from the genus Geomys, wood rats from the genus Neotoma, and ground squirrels from the genus Ictodomys to determine if zonadhesin is functioning as a reproductive isolation barrier to gene flow. My future career interests involve the evolution of both pre- and post-mating reproductive isolation in various species of mammals.

 

Taylor J. Soniat
Teaching Assistant


M.S. Student, Zoology, Texas Tech University
B.S. Zoology, Oklahoma State University


taylor.soniat@ttu.edu


During my time as an undergraduate, I spent three years working in the Collection of Vertebrates at Oklahoma State University. I then joined Dr. Bradley’s lab in August of 2015 as a Master’s student. My area of research focuses on frozen tissues and how different archival systems affect the DNA quality. I hope to use what I learn here, and apply it to the field of museum studies; eventually becoming a natural history museum curator.

 

Emily Wright
Teaching Assistant


M.S. Student, Zoology, Texas Tech University
B.S. Zoology, Texas Tech University


emily.a.wright@ttu.edu


In the summer of 2016 I started working in Dr. Bradley’s lab, pursuing a Master’s thesis. Currently, I am examining mechanisms that allow hybridization between White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus). Currently, I’m exploring the role that zonadhesin (ZAN) plays in post-mating isolation. My ultimate goal is to obtain a Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine, specializing in the reintroduction of exotic species into their native habitats.

 

 

Former Laboratory Associates